Protest and March for George Floyd takes place in Twin Lakes

/Earlene Frederick photo

Twin Lakes was the site of a protest and march for George Floyd Saturday evening.

Floyd died while being taken into custody by Minneapolis police officers on May 25 for passing forged money. Floyd was black; the officer charged with causing his death is white. Four officers involved in the incident have been fired and all now face various criminal charges.

The Twin Lakes march and protest was organized by local resident Thomas Sams. It began at Lance Park, where several speakers addressed the crowd. Tracy McConnell, from New Life Bible Church read some scripture and prayed. There was an 8 minute and 46 second silent kneel. That’s the amount of time that the police officer knelt on Floyd’s neck before Floyd died. The group then marched up North Lake Avenue and then back to the park.

Twin Lakes police escorted the marchers, who walked on the sidewalk. Some people did line the route to watch. There was some some verbal confrontation, but nothing escalated. About 75 people attended.

Here is some video by Earlene Frederick from the event:

One of the speakers was Sheriff’s Department Capt. Bill Beth. Here is a portion of his remarks:

I’ll admit it, when people said “Black Lives Matter” I thought “All Lives Matter.” And I meant it. All life is sacred. That’s why I and the overwhelming officers in this country are in this profession. Believe me, on some calls it often appears that we are the only ones who believe someone else’s life matters. In Minnesota we clearly saw that not all officers believe or behave in a way that shows all life is sacred. More work has to be done to prevent officers from losing their humanity in this job. And to remove from our ranks those who choose to view those they serve and protect as somehow less and undeserving of dignity, respect and basic human decency. As I was reflecting on the phrase “Black Lives Matter” the other day I thought of the three children, now adults, which my wife and I have raised. As young children there were times where one child would feel slighted, neglected or unloved. Our response as parents was not to tell them that we loved all of our children but, to tell them individually that we loved them. At the risk of sounding overly paternalistic, there is a segment in America that is hurting and wondering if they are loved and valued. Those Americans don’t need to hear “All Lives Matter”. They know that. What they need to hear, especially now, is “Black Lives Matter”. They need to hear that from us, from me.

Protests in memory of George Floyd have been taking place all over the country in the last week.

Here are some more photos from Twin Lakes (by Earlene Frederick):

/Earlene Frederick photo

/Earlene Frederick photo

/Earlene Frederick photo

/Earlene Frederick photo

/Earlene Frederick photo

/Earlene Frederick photo

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